© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Cheaper Trash Cans In Hartford

http://cptv.vo.llnwd.net/o2/ypmwebcontent/Jeff%20Cohen/2011_06_17_JC%20110617%20Trash.mp3

The city of Hartford has approved a plan to cut the cost of its residential trash bins in half.  
 
The city has the kind of can that can be picked up by a mechanical arm and its trash dumped into a truck.  But, at $70 for a new or replacement bin, they’re kind of pricey.
 
“I’m getting the sense that people are not happy having to spend, you know, $70.”
 
 
That’s Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra, who backed a plan recently approved by the city council to cut that fee in half.
 
“I had wanted to provide replacement garbage receptacles for free."
 
But a tight budget means no free trash cans.
 
Councilman Ken Kennedy supported the change.
 
“The feeling among the council, me particularly, was that that was an outrageously large price to pay.”
 
Segarra says that the new price will apply to the 90-gallon cans.  He says the city is looking into selling smaller cans, too.

Jeff Cohen started in newspapers in 2001 and joined Connecticut Public in 2010, where he worked as a reporter and fill-in host. In 2017, he was named news director. Then, in 2022, he became a senior enterprise reporter.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.