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Experts weigh in on teaching kids about war in the classroom after the Ukraine invasion

Liza Yankovsky, age 3, was among many children gathered on the New Haven Green. The regular chanting of, "Save our children" made it clear just what those gathered felt is at stake in Ukraine.
Tyler Russell
/
Connecticut Public
Liza Yankovsky, age 3, was among many children on the New Haven Green on Sunday, March 6, 2022. The regular chanting of "save our children" made it clear just what those gathered felt is at stake in Ukraine.

Many parents are fielding questions from their kids about the Russian invasion of Ukraine. And some teachers are facing similar questions. But for educators, teaching students about global affairs can be a bit tricky.

Two experts spoke with Connecticut Public's Lori Mack to offer tips and to discuss a new interactive game designed to teach foreign policy and global civics lessons.

Julie Silverbrook is senior director of partnerships and a constitutional scholar in residence at iCivics, a nonprofit organization that promotes civics education and provides resources for teachers.

And Caroline Netchvolodoff is vice president of education at the Council on Foreign Relations, an independent, nonpartisan think tank specializing in U.S. foreign policy and international affairs.

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