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UConn’s Dan Hurley celebrates two picks in the top 7 of NBA Draft

UConn guard Stephon Castle (5) react in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, Sunday, March 3, 2024, in Storrs, Conn.
Jessica Hill
/
AP
UConn guard Stephon Castle (5) react in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, Sunday, March 3, 2024, in Storrs, Conn.

Two UConn players went in the top seven of this year’s NBA Draft Wednesday. Stephon Castle was picked No. 4 by the San Antonio Spurs and Donovan Clingan, a Bristol native, went to the Portland Trailblazers at No. 7.

“Everybody won. We won championships, they won their dream,” Hurley said on ESPN.

UConn's Donovan Clingan (32) celebrates after the 88-65 win against Arkansas of a Sweet 16 college basketball game in the West Regional of the NCAA Tournament, Thursday, March 23, 2023, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
John Locher/AP
/
AP
UConn's Donovan Clingan (32) celebrates after the 88-65 win against Arkansas of a Sweet 16 college basketball game in the West Regional of the NCAA Tournament, Thursday, March 23, 2023, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

The Atlanta Hawks took Zaccharie Risacher with the No. 1 pick, the second straight year a player from France was the first player selected.

The French landed three players in the top six picks, a year after Victor Wembanyama was the first player selected.

Castle of the two-time reigning national champion Huskies made it two straight college freshmen when San Antonio took him at No. 4, the Spurs’ first of two picks in the top 10.

Clingan, who won titles in both seasons in Storrs.

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