© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

CT attorney general launches investigation into Hyundai and Kia following string of thefts

A line of 2022 Santa Fe SUV's sit outside a Hyundai dealership Sunday, Sept. 12, 2021, in Littleton, Colo. Nearly three months after Hyundai and Kia rolled out new software designed to thwart rampant auto thefts, crooks are still driving off with the vehicles at an alarming rate.
David Zalubowski
/
AP
A line of 2022 Santa Fe SUV's sit outside a Hyundai dealership Sunday, Sept. 12, 2021, in Littleton, Colo. Nearly three months after Hyundai and Kia rolled out new software designed to thwart rampant auto thefts, crooks are still driving off with the vehicles at an alarming rate.

The state of Connecticut is launching an investigation into Hyundai and Kia vehicles following a string of thefts in the state and across the country.

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong says the companies have failed to equip certain vehicles with industry standard anti-theft technology.

Most Kias and Huyndais made between 2011 and 2022 don’t have an anti-theft immobilizer, an electronic device that prevents a car from being hot-wired and stolen without a key.

Tong says that civil investigative requests sent to both Hyundai and Kia are seeking records and information regarding vehicles sold in Connecticut, along with complaints to the companies regarding the theft issue. Tong says the thefts have forced local law enforcement to divert scarce resources to increased patrols and theft investigations.

“This is a very serious issue that we have called on Kia and Hyundai to fix and they haven't done it,” he said at a press conference Tuesday.

Tong in April joined a coalition of 18 attorneys general asking for the vehicles to be recalled.

Hyundai and Kia in May reached a settlement to resolve a nationwide class-action lawsuitrelated to the thefts. The companies have unveiled software designed to address the thefts. Hyundai says it’s using direct mail, phone calls, digital advertising and social media to try to reach affected owners.

Connecticut Public's Abigail Brone and Eric Aasen, as well as The Associated Press, contributed to this report.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content