© 2022 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

The Pope Walks Into An Elevator. He Gets Stuck For 25 Minutes.

Pope Francis delivers his blessing during the noon prayer from the window of his studio overlooking St.Peter's Square on Sunday. Francis told the crowd that before his address, he had been stuck in an elevator for 25 minutes, causing him to be late.
Alessandra Tarantino
/
AP
Pope Francis delivers his blessing during the noon prayer from the window of his studio overlooking St.Peter's Square on Sunday. Francis told the crowd that before his address, he had been stuck in an elevator for 25 minutes, causing him to be late.

The pope was running late.

For seven excruciating minutes, thousands of gatherers on Sunday in St Peter's Square in Vatican City were anxiously waiting for Pope Francis to show up for his weekly address, which usually starts, like clockwork, exactly at noon. Questions and worries that something may be seriously amiss made many onlookers fret.

But finally, the window of the Apostolic Palace swung open and a smiling 82-year-old pontiff sent relief across the crowd.

What explained the delay? The pope had been trapped in an elevator, an unfazed pontiff told the gatherers.

"I must apologize for the delay," said Francis, explaining that there was a drop of voltage in the elevator, causing it to stop.

Francis told the crowd he had been trapped in the elevator for 25 minutes, but intervention from firefighters — whether divine or not — saved the day.

"Thank God the Fire Brigade came," Francis said. "Let's hear it for the Fire Brigade!"

The pontiff then moved to his usual prayers and blessings. He ended his remarks by announcing that 13 church figures had been elevated to cardinals.

The Vatican did not clarify whether the pope was alone in the malfunctioning elevator, or if any of his aides were by his side when Francis was stuck.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content