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Housing issues affect everyone in Connecticut, from those who are searching for a safe place to live, to those who may find it increasingly difficult to afford a place they already call home.WNPR is covering Connecticut's housing and homelessness issues in a series that examines how residents are handling the challenges they face. We look at the trends that matter most right now, and tell stories that help bring the issues to light.

Defining The American Dream In 2018

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It’s been ten years since the Great Recession reared its ugly head, lurching the country into a state of economic crisis. 

This hour, we look back and ask: What effect did the downturn have on the American public? And how did it come to reshape perceptions of the so-called ‘American dream’?

We check in with a senior researcher at the Pew Research Center. We also sit down with experts in the fields of economics and sociology. And we want to hear from you.

Whether you’re an immigrant or a native-born citizen, what do the words American dream mean to you? Is the answer to that question more or less clear now than it was a decade ago? 

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

GUESTS:

READING LIST:

Pew Research Center: Gen X rebounds as the only generation to recover the wealth lost after the housing crash - "But while the economic downturn had a disproportionately negative impact on Gen Xers, their fortunes have rebounded more than those of other generations during the post-recession economic expansion and as home and stock prices have risen."

Vox: Getting ahead in the city is hard. In rural America, it's even harder. - "'There are certain type of cities, if you’re poor, you definitely want to be there,' says John Lettieri, EIG’s senior director for policy and strategy. 'But in general, the divide between city and rural opportunity is definitely becoming more stark.'"

The Wall Street Journal: Parents' Jobs Increasingly Shape How Far Kids Get in Life - "Just over half of Americans born in the 1980s have ended up with better jobs than their parents, according to an article by New York University sociology professor Michael Hout in the journal 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.' That’s down from two-thirds of people born in the 1940s."

For more on The New American Dream Foundation's American Dream Awards, click here

Chion Wolf contributed to this show.

Lucy is the Executive Producer and Host of Connecticut Public's morning talk show, 'Where We Live.' She’s a longtime public radio reporter covering several beats including immigration, juvenile justice and child welfare issues, education, veterans affairs and the military.

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