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The Parking Brake Was Found Set After A Jet Crashed In Farmington On Takeoff

PLANE CRASH
Joe Amon
/
Connecticut Public
Federal investigators say the Cessna 560XL that crashed into Trumpf Inc. earlier this month still had its parking brake on. The plane had taken off from Robertson Airport in Plainville and was headed to North Carolina. The two pilots and two passengers were killed.

We’re learning more about the possible cause of a plane crash near the Farmington-Plainville town line earlier this month that killed the four people on board.

A new preliminary report from the National Transportation Safety Board indicates that the plane’s parking brake was engaged when investigators examined the wreckage.

The report also includes details from witnesses, who told investigators that they noticed the Cessna 560XL moving slowly as it headed down the runway for takeoff.

The plane stayed on the ground past the end of the runway, and skid marks from it were found on and beyond the runway, according to the report.

It hit a utility pole and ended up crashing into the building that houses manufacturer Trumpf Inc.

The crash killed pilots William O’Leary, 55, from Bristol, and Mark Morrow, 57, from Danbury, and passengers Courtney Haviland, 33, and William Shrauner, 31, husband-and-wife doctors from Boston.

The plane was on its way to Dare County Regional Airport in North Carolina.

Matt Dwyer is a producer for Where We Live and a reporter and midday host for Connecticut Public's news department.

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