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The Connecticut NAACP's president demands change after a New Haven man was hurt in a police van

Body camera footage provided by New Haven Police Department show Richard "Randy" Cox being placed inside a NHPD patrol car after being arrested. Cox was subsequently moved into a NHPD transport van where his neck was broken en route to NHPD headquarters after the driver stopped suddenly to avoid a collision. Cox is in the hospital with no mobility from his chest down and on a feeding tube. Cox was arrested near a block party on charges of criminal possession of a firearm, possessing a gun without a permit and breach of peace.
New Haven Police Department
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New Haven Police Department
Body camera footage provided by New Haven police shows Richard "Randy" Cox being placed inside an NHPD patrol car after his arrest. Cox was later moved into a police transport van where his neck was broken after the driver stopped suddenly to avoid a collision. Cox is hospitalized, has no mobility from his chest down and is on a feeding tube. He was arrested near a block party on charges of criminal possession of a firearm, possessing a gun without a permit and breach of peace.

As we continue to process and follow developments regarding how New Haven resident Richard “Randy” Cox suffered paralysis-inducing injuries in the back of a New Haven police van, Connecticut NAACP President Scot X. Esdaile spoke about the situation on All Things Considered.

He evaluated why he thinks this incident happened, the reaction of New Haven city leaders and how things need to change going forward.

John Henry Smith is Connecticut Public’s host of All Things Considered, its flagship afternoon news program. He's proud to be a part of the team that won a regional Emmy Award for The Vote: A Connecticut Conversation. In his 21st year as a professional broadcaster, he’s covered both news and sports.

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