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Western Massachusetts towns recovering from major winter storm

A road in Windsor, Massachusetts, after a major winter storm on March 14, 2023.
James Hyatt
/
Submitted Photo
A road in Windsor, Massachusetts, after a major winter storm on March 14, 2023.

In the aftermath of a major winter storm, several western Massachusetts town officials said they have mostly recovered from the impact.

Almost all residents in Conway have power back.

Police Chief Kenneth Ouimette said the town worked to make sure line workers from Eversource could get where they needed to in order to restore service. He said they came from all over the country.

"I've talked to guys from Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Michigan," he said.

Madeline Scully, who is the town administrator in Windsor, said power was restored to the last resident Thursday morning. That's after the town got three and a half feet of snow in some places.

"We have a team of volunteers that was helping to plow driveways or shovel," she said. "Today, I think we're shoveling out the last resident, who needed shoveling to an oil tank to get an oil delivery."

Scully said most of her calls on Friday were from residents wanting to bake or cook for the town's highway department.

In preparation for the storm, an Eversource spokesperson said the company had prepositioned 900 line crews and 550 tree crews across Massachusetts.

Before joining New England Public Media, Alden was a producer for the CBS NEWS program 60 Minutes. In that role, he covered topics ranging from art, music and medicine to business, education and politics.

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