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Is our economic sky falling? UConn economist weighs in on inflation concerns

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Lawmakers from both parties are stepping up calls to ban members of Congress from trading individual stocks.
Spencer Platt
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Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Lawmakers from both parties are stepping up calls to ban members of Congress from trading individual stocks.

Inflation is at a 40-year high. Gas prices are skyrocketing. The Federal Reserve is promising interest rate hikes. It can seem these days that an economic elephant is trying to crush us all.

Joining us on "All Things Considered" to make sense of it all was UConn economics professor Steven Lanza. He talked about his reaction to rising prices, if politicians are to blame and his take on whether companies are profiteering.

Lanza also offers his reaction to U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal’s push for suspending the federal gasoline tax and what he thinks Connecticut’s leadership can — and can’t — do to help state residents cope.

John Henry Smith is Connecticut Public’s host of All Things Considered, its flagship afternoon news program. In his 20th year as a professional broadcaster, he’s covered both news and sports.

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