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Where are all the gun violence protestors?

Several hundred activists marched in downtown San Antonio on Saturday to bring attention to gun violence and to advocate for changes to gun laws.
Jennifer Gonzalez
/
Texas Public Radio
Several hundred activists marched in downtown San Antonio on Saturday to bring attention to gun violence and to advocate for changes to gun laws.

Last weekend, from the east coast to the west coast and here in Connecticut, tens of thousands of people protested against gun violence in the wake of our latest spate of mass shooting murders.

And yet, last weekend’s protests happened weeks after the shootings in Uvalde, Texas and in Buffalo, New York. The type of immediate outpouring in cities across the country, and the world, that we saw after the George Floyd killing didn’t really happen.

That's true both in terms of timing and in terms of turnout.

The New York Times estimated 15-to-26 million people participated around the world in the early days after the Floyd video became public.

For insight into why the widely expressed outrage over those shootings did not translate into a more massive, immediate protest movement, Professor Lauren Duncan of Smith College joined "All Things Considered."

She’s written extensively on the psychology of protest and activism.

John Henry Smith is Connecticut Public’s host of All Things Considered, its flagship afternoon news program. In his 20th year as a professional broadcaster, he’s covered both news and sports.

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