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Instead of promised tax relief, many drivers in Connecticut were hit with higher car tax bills

A customer prepares to pump gas into her car at a gas station in San Rafael, Calif., on May 20. Surging gas prices have been a major pain point for many household budgets.
Justin Sullivan
/
Getty Images
A customer prepares to pump gas into her car at a gas station in San Rafael, Calif., on May 20.

The good news was that the state would lower the cap in over 70 municipalities this year on car taxes from $45 per $1,000 of assessed car value (or 45 mills) to 32.46 mills.

The bad news is that many taxpayers have found that, because of higher used car valuations during the pandemic, their car tax bills are actually higher than they were last year.

Hearst Connecticut reporter Abigail Brone has been following this situation. She joined "All Things Considered" to talk about how we got here and what could happen next.

John Henry Smith is Connecticut Public’s host of All Things Considered, its flagship afternoon news program. In his 20th year as a professional broadcaster, he’s covered both news and sports.

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