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Connecticut’s Democratic elected leaders react to their statewide victories

 Election Day Nov 08 2022
Tony Spinelli
/
Connecticut Public
After casting his ballot in the midterm election, Gov. Ned Lamont approaches Democratic supporters outside Greenwich High School on Nov. 8, 2022.

Gov. Ned Lamont said the results of Tuesday's voting showed broad-based support for Democratic candidates, including in suburban communities and some rural towns.

Lamont easily won reelection Tuesday, getting more than 55% of the votes.

In a written statement, Republican challenger Bob Stefanowski acknowledged that he lost Tuesday’s election. Stefanowski said the results were not what he and his supporters had hoped for, and he urged his followers to continue asking questions of state government.

Lamont accepted Stefanowski's concession Wednesday morning.

“I got a call this morning from Bob Stefanowski congratulating us on the win,” Lamont said. “I see a lot of fiction, a lot of edginess, across the country when it comes to elections. But not in Connecticut. When the election’s over, we come back together, we work as one, and we work together.”

Tuesday’s election was a rematch between Lamont and Stefanowski. Lamont won by 12 percentage points this time, a wider margin compared to 2018 when Lamont defeated Stefanowski by 3 points.

Lt. Gov. Susan Bysiewicz talked about the victory on Connecticut Public’s “Where We Live.”

“Having won by double digits shows that people felt very confident in the governor’s leadership … and we so appreciate the confidence that the people of Connecticut have shown in us,” she said.

Bysiewicz said voters told her how appreciative they were of Lamont’s leadership during the pandemic.

Democrats dominated other statewide races as well. William Tong was reelected as attorney general, and Stephanie Thomas will become the next secretary of the state.

Tong said on Twitter: “Thank you Connecticut. It has been an extraordinary and consequential four years, and I am humbled and honored by the decisive support today.”

Matt Dwyer is a producer for Where We Live and a reporter and midday host for Connecticut Public's news department.

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