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State leaders honor life and legacy of former CT Gov. Lowell Weicker

Pallbearers bring out former Gov. Lowell Weicker Jr. from Saint Barnabas Church after funeral services in Greenwich on  Monday, July 10, 2023.
Aaron Flaum
/
Hartford Courant
Pallbearers bring out former Gov. Lowell Weicker Jr. from Saint Barnabas Church after funeral services in Greenwich on Monday, July 10, 2023.

Former U.S. Senator and Connecticut Governor Lowell Weicker Jr. was remembered in a funeral service Monday.

The funeral was held at St. Barnabas Church in Greenwich and was attended by various federal and state officials. Gov. Ned Lamont recently called Weicker “bigger than life.”

Lamont delivered the eulogy. Weicker’s children and grandchildren recited biblical passages honoring their grandfather.

Other politicians and former administrative staff lauded Weicker for his principled stances on protecting the most marginalized in society, from fighting for AIDS research, the Americans with Disabilities Act and others.

His former chief of staff, Stanley Twardy, said Weicker gave him important advice.

“He taught me to appreciate a good burden,” Twardy said.

Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont greets former Senator Christopher Dodd, after Dodd spoke at the funeral and memorial service for Lowell Weicker. Dodd served with Weicker in the US Senate.
CTN
Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont greets former Senator Christopher Dodd, after Dodd spoke at the funeral and memorial service for Lowell Weicker. Dodd said his former Senate colleague Weicker was "a brave man."

Weicker died on June 28 after a brief illness. His death led to politicians across the state offering condolences and retrospectives on a person many characterized as unafraid to ruffle feathers. Weicker got his political start in 1963 as a state representative then went on to become a first selectman for Greenwich.

He was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1970 and quickly gained national attention for his opposition to then President Richard Nixon, a fellow Republican, in the aftermath of the Watergate break-in, which would later result in Nixon being the second sitting president to be impeached, ending in his resignation in 1974.

Weicker was 92 years old.

FILE - Sen. Lowell Weicker, R-Conn., tells a Senate subcommittee on April 8, 1974, in Washington, DC, that a secret task force to compile intelligence reports on President Nixon's political enemies was set up inside the Internal Revenue Service within months of Nixon becoming president. Weicker, a Republican U.S. senator who tussled with his own party during the Watergate hearings, championed legislation to protect people with disabilities and later was elected Connecticut governor as an independent, died Wednesday, June 28, 2023, at a hospital in Middletown, Conn., after a short illness. He was 92.
AP
/
AP
FILE - Sen. Lowell Weicker, R-Conn., tells a Senate subcommittee on April 8, 1974, in Washington, DC, that a secret task force to compile intelligence reports on President Nixon's political enemies was set up inside the Internal Revenue Service within months of Nixon becoming president. Weicker, a Republican U.S. senator who tussled with his own party during the Watergate hearings, championed legislation to protect people with disabilities and later was elected Connecticut governor as an independent, died Wednesday, June 28, 2023, at a hospital in Middletown, Conn., after a short illness.

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