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Fresh Air Weekend: 'Afghanistan Undercover' filmmaker; Why college is broken

A girl sits in front of a bakery in the crowd with Afghan women waiting to receive bread in Kabul on Jan. 31, 2022.
Ali Khara
/
Reuters
A girl sits in front of a bakery in the crowd with Afghan women waiting to receive bread in Kabul on Jan. 31, 2022.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Undercover journalist in Afghanistan finds Taliban are abducting, imprisoning women: Filmmaker Ramita Navai has seen girls and women forced to marry Taliban members or arrested for violating the morality code. Her new PBS Frontline documentary is Afghanistan Undercover.

The ordinariness of 'Ali & Ava' is what makes it extraordinary: A Pakistani immigrant and an Irish-born grandmother fall in love in a bleak English town in this sunny and upbeat film. Ali & Ava is a lovely, charming surprise.

College is increasingly out of reach for many students. What went wrong?: Journalist Will Bunch says instead of opening the door to a better life, college leaves many students deep in debt and unable to find well-paying jobs. His new book is After the Ivory Tower Falls.

You can listen to the original interviews and review here:

Undercover journalist in Afghanistan finds Taliban are abducting, imprisoning women

The ordinariness of 'Ali & Ava' is what makes it extraordinary

College is increasingly out of reach for many students. What went wrong?

Copyright 2022 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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