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Fresh Air Weekend: Tonya Mosley; The worsening climate crisis

Tonya Mosley credits her grandfather with inspiring her career in journalism. She is the new co-host of <em>Fresh Air.</em>
Erika Verik
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Tonya Mosley
Tonya Mosley credits her grandfather with inspiring her career in journalism. She is the new co-host of Fresh Air.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

'Fresh Air' hosts Terry Gross and Tonya Mosley talk news, Detroit and psychedelics: Throughout her career, Mosley has often been one of the few Black journalists in the newsroom. She recently reported first-hand on the use of psilocybin to heal racial trauma.

Buckle up: This mile-a-minute 'Joy Ride' across China is a raunchy romp: It's hard not to get swept up in this journey — full of filthy one-liners and priceless sight gags. And the film pulls it off with a level of savvy about Asian culture still rarely seen in Hollywood.

Our 'Scorched Planet' is getting hotter, and no one is immune to rising temperatures: Author Jeff Goodell warns a new climate regime is coming: "We don't really know what we're heading into and how chaotic this can get." His new book is The Heat Will Kill You First.

You can listen to the original interviews and review here:

Fresh Air' hosts Terry Gross and Tonya Mosley talk news, Detroit and psychedelics

Buckle up: This mile-a-minute 'Joy Ride' across China is a raunchy romp

Our 'Scorched Planet' is getting hotter, and no one is immune to rising temperatures

Copyright 2023 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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