© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY
WECS · WEDW-FM · WNPR · WPKT · WRLI-FM · WVOF
Public Files Contact · ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Small plane crashes into Florida mobile home, killing 3 people

In this image made from video, a fire engine, firefighters and other officials are seen inside police tape on scene of a small plane crash in Clearwater, Florida, Feb. 1, 2024.
AP
In this image made from video, a fire engine, firefighters and other officials are seen inside police tape on scene of a small plane crash in Clearwater, Florida, Feb. 1, 2024.

Updated February 2, 2024 at 11:11 AM ET

Three people were killed after a small plane crashed into a mobile home in Clearwater, Fla., on Thursday.

The Federal Aviation Administration identified those killed as a member of the flight crew and two people on the ground.

At about 7:08 p.m. ET, authorities received simultaneous calls about a structure fire and a "mayday" signal from the pilot of an aircraft that went off radar about three miles from the runway of the St. Pete–Clearwater International Airport, Clearwater Fire and Rescue Department Chief Scott Ehlers said.

Responders arrived at the scene at 7:15 p.m. Four mobile homes, including one the plane crashed into, were on fire at the Bayside Waters mobile home park, Ehlers said.

"I can confirm that we have several fatalities, both from the aircraft and within the mobile home," Ehlers said. He added that people in the other three homes got out safely.

The airplane was identified as a Beechcraft Bonanza V35, a small single-engine model, according to the FAA.

Ehlers said the local fire and rescue department is working with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board to identify the pilot and passengers aboard the plane.

"Please understand that we're working through a very complicated scene," he said. "There's going to be a lot of agencies that are here... to help coordinate in the investigation of actually what happened, so we're limited on some of the information we can provide, but we'll do our best to get you the right, updated information."

Copyright 2024 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Ayana Archie
[Copyright 2024 NPR]
Juliana Kim
Juliana Kim is a weekend reporter for Digital News, where she adds context to the news of the day and brings her enterprise skills to NPR's signature journalism.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content