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Environment

State Environment Commissioner Katie Dykes On Connecticut's Looming Waste Crisis

The MIRA trash-to-energy plant in Hartford, which is now slated to shut down in 2022
Cloe Poisson
/
Connecticut Mirror
The MIRA trash-to-energy plant in Hartford, which is now slated to shut down in 2022

For years, Connecticut sent large portions of waste to the Materials Innovation and Recycling Authority (MIRA) trash-to-energy plant in Hartford. This, in spite of protests by Hartford residents, who say pollution from the plant has caused health problems. Now, the plant will close in 2022.

Today, we talk with Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) Commissioner Katie Dykes about the state's garbage.

The commissioner has said the state is facing a “waste crisis” in coming years. So what’s the solution?

We also ask her about the state’s energy future, including the role of fossil fuels like natural gas that the state currently relies on to keep the lights on.

What questions do you have for Commissioner Dykes?

GUESTS:

  • Katie Dykes - Commissioner of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP)
  • Sharon Lewis - Executive Director of the Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice
  • Adrian Huq - Cofounder of the New Haven Climate Movement's Youth Action Team

Cat Pastor contributed to this show.

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