© 2023 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Connecticut Health Commissioner Juthani on possible COVID surge: 'Something may be coming'

Dr. Manisha Juthani at podium
Joe Amon
/
Connecticut Public
Public Health Commissioner Dr. Manisha Juthani answers questions during an announcement of the state’s rollout of the Screen and Stay initiative for Connecticut schools on Nov. 4, 2021, in Newington, Connecticut.

Connecticut’s Commissioner of Public Health, Dr. Manisha Juthani, warned on "All Things Considered" that she's seeing evidence that a coronavirus surge could soon be on the way to Connecticut.

This time, the main threat appears to be the BA.2 omicron subvariant that has come to America after plaguing Western Europe and other regions in recent weeks.

* * * * *

Juthani said officials have been keeping an eye on the BA.2 subvariant. Her staff has been following virus developments in New York City and monitoring wastewater data in Connecticut, she said.

“We’ve seen an uptick,” Juthani said. “And given that we have seen rises happen in the U.K. and a small potential rise in Connecticut, we just want people to be aware that we may see a rise in our community as well.”

Juthani also spoke about resources available and programs underway to help Connecticut residents prepare.

She said older state residents can protect themselves by following recent advice from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to get a second booster shot.

The BA.2 subvariant accounts for more than half of new coronavirus cases around the country.

John Henry Smith is Connecticut Public’s host of All Things Considered, its flagship afternoon news program. In his 20th year as a professional broadcaster, he’s covered both news and sports.
Matt Dwyer is a producer for Where We Live and a reporter and midday host for Connecticut Public's news department.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.