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Adama Sanogo leaving UConn for NBA draft

UConn's Adama Sanogo reacts as he holds the trophy during a parade to celebrate the team's NCAA college basketball championship, Saturday, April 8, 2023, in Hartford, Conn. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
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UConn's Adama Sanogo reacts as he holds the trophy during a parade to celebrate the team's NCAA college basketball championship, Saturday, April 8, 2023, in Hartford, Conn. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — UConn center Adama Sanogo announced Thursday he will leave the national champions and make himself eligible for the NBA draft.

The 6-foot-9 junior from Mali, who was named Most Outstanding Player at this year's Final Four, made his decision public in an Instagram post, thanking his family and coaches for their support.

“I am so excited for the next stop on my journey and proud to announce that I will declare for the 2023 NBA Draft and will stay focused on the process and giving myself every chance possible to hear my name called,” he wrote. “I will always cherish my time at UConn and will always be my home away from home.”

Sanogo averaged 17.8 points and eight rebounds in helping UConn to a 31-8 record and a fifth national title. He improved on those stats during the Huskies' NCAA Tournament run, averaging 19.7 points and 10 rebounds over those six games.

But Sanogo is considered undersized for a post and will have to convince NBA teams that his skill set will translate to the league.

He is the second Husky to declare for the draft. Sophomore guard Jordan Hawkins made a similar announcement last Friday.

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