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Actor Treat Williams, CT native and star of 'Hair' and 'Everwood', is killed in VT motorcycle crash

DORSET, Vt. — Actor Treat Williams, whose nearly 50-year career included starring roles in the TV series Everwood and the movie Hair, died Monday after a motorcycle crash in Vermont, state police said. He was 71.

Shortly before 5 p.m., a Honda SUV was turning left into a parking lot when it collided with Williams' motorcycle in the town of Dorset, according to a statement from Vermont State Police.

"Williams was unable to avoid a collision and was thrown from his motorcycle. He suffered critical injuries and was airlifted to Albany Medical Center in Albany, New York, where he was pronounced dead," according to the statement.

Williams was wearing a helmet, police said.

The SUV's driver received minor injuries and wasn't hospitalized. He had signaled the turn and wasn't immediately detained although the crash investigation continued, police said.

Williams, whose full name was Richard Treat Williams, lived in Manchester Center in southern Vermont, police said.

His agent, Barry McPherson, also confirmed the actor's death.

"I'm just devastated. He was the nicest guy. He was so talented," McPherson told People magazine.

"He was an actor's actor," McPherson said. "Filmmakers loved him. He's been the heart of the Hollywood since the late 1970s."

The Connecticut-born Williams made his movie debut in 1975 as a police officer in the movie Deadly Hero and went on to appear in more than 120 TV and film roles, including the movies The Eagle Has Landed, Prince of the City and Once Upon a Time in America.

He was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for his role as hippie leader George Berger in the 1979 movie version of the hit musical Hair.

U.S. actors, from left, Don Dacus, Annie Golden, Treat Williams, Beverly d'Angelo, director Milos Forman, and Cheryl Barnes arrive for the presentation of <em>Hair</em> during the 32nd Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, France May 10, 1979.
Levy / AP
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AP
U.S. actors, from left, Don Dacus, Annie Golden, Treat Williams, Beverly d'Angelo, director Milos Forman, and Cheryl Barnes arrive for the presentation of Hair during the 32nd Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, France May 10, 1979.

He appeared in dozens of television shows but was perhaps best known for his starring role from 2002 to 2006 in Everwood as Dr. Andrew Brown, a widowed brain surgeon from Manhattan who moves with his two children to the Colorado mountain town of that name.

Williams also had a recurring role as Lenny Ross on the TV show Blue Bloods.

Williams' stage appearances included Broadway shows, including Grease and Pirates of Penzance.

Colleagues and friends praised Williams as kind, generous and creative.

"Treat and I spent months in Rome filming Once Upon a Time in America," actor James Woods tweeted. "It can be pretty lonely on the road during a long shoot, but his resilient good cheer and sense of humor was a Godsend. I really loved him and am devastated that he's gone."

"Working with Treat Williams in Mamet's Speed the Plow at Williamstown in '91 was the start of great friendship," tweeted writer, director and producer Justine Williams. "Damn it, damn it. Treat, you were the best. Love you."

"Treat Williams was a passionate, adventurous, creative man," actor Wendell Pierce tweeted. "In a short period of time, he quickly befriended me & his adventurous spirit was infectious. We worked on just 1 film together but occasionally connected over the years. Kind and generous with advice and support. RIP."

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

The Associated Press
[Copyright 2024 NPR]

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