© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY
WECS · WEDW-FM · WNPR · WPKT · WRLI-FM · WVOF
Public Files Contact · ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

High school seniors encouraged to apply for automatic CT college admission

Emily Rodriguez, a senior at New Britain High School, applied to the Connecticut Automatic Admissions Program in October. She plans to attend Central Connecticut State University in the fall, pursuing a degree in education.
Abigail Brone
/
Connecticut Public
Emily Rodriguez, a senior at New Britain High School, applied to the Connecticut Automatic Admissions Program in October. She plans to attend Central Connecticut State University in the fall, pursuing a degree in education.

The deadline for Connecticut’s Automatic Admissions Program is quickly approaching and state leaders are encouraging graduating high school seniors to apply.

Seniors who are graduating next spring have until January 4 to apply for the program. It grants eligible seniors automatic admission to nine colleges and universities in Connecticut. The students must be in the top 30% of their class to qualify for the program.

Participating schools include Central and Eastern Connecticut State University, University of New Haven and Goodwin University.

Gov. Ned Lamont was joined by New Britain Mayor Erin Stewart and local university representatives Tuesday to encourage New Britain High School students to apply.

The program is designed to make it easier for students to apply to local colleges. It was also created to encourage low-income and potential first-generation college students to earn higher degrees, Lamont said.

“It can be, sometimes, a little tricky applying to college and we’re trying to take all the hassle, all those speed bumps out of the way,” Lamont said. “I want you to know exactly what your opportunities are now.”

Emily Rodriguez, a senior at New Britain High School, applied for the program in October after receiving a letter of eligibility from the school. She said the process was easy and validated her hard work during the last four years.

“Knowing that I am going to Central Connecticut State University in the fall of 2024 because of this program that made it much simpler is a really great feeling,” Rodriguez said.

Rodriguez plans to major in education and pursue a career in teaching.

Last year when the program was first implemented there were 1,600 applicants, according to Connecticut State Colleges and Universities chancellor Terrence Cheng. This year more than 2,300 students have applied, and the state anticipates the number will rise to about 3,000 applicants by the January 4 deadline.

In the upcoming legislative session, Cheng is hoping to tweak the program by focusing admission on Grade Point Average rather than class rank, allowing more students to qualify.

Abigail is Connecticut Public's housing reporter, covering statewide housing developments and issues, with an emphasis on Fairfield County communities. She received her master's from Columbia University in 2020 and graduated from the University of Connecticut in 2019. Abigail previously covered statewide transportation and the city of Norwalk for Hearst Connecticut Media. She loves all things Disney and cats.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content