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The Scramble: Changing the Gun Conversation

Emily Stanchfield
/
Creative Commons
Is there a more effective way to talk about mass violence in the United States?

Our weekly Monday afternoon "Scramble" continues the conversation arising from last week’s school shooting in Oregon. As the number of mass shootings continues to rise, the nationwide discussion has reached a stalemate. Is there a different, more effective way to talk about guns? 

Also, two new seasons get started but in very different realms. The Supreme Court of the United States begins hearing arguments in what is a widely anticipated session. We'll learn the results of these cases next spring. Meanwhile Saturday Night Live started its 41st season after stockpiling jokes and impressions over the summer and the "Not Ready For Primetime Players" hit the ground running.

GUESTS:

  • Jennifer Tucker - Associate Professor of History and Science in Society at Wesleyan University
  • Eric Deggans - NPR's TV critic
  • Dahlia Lithwick - Slate's courts and law reporter

Colin McEnroe, Lydia Brown, Betsy Kaplan, and Chion Wolf contributed to this show.

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Tucker Ives is WNPR's morning news producer.

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