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What Really Happened The Night 43 Students Disappeared?

Family members of 43 missing students from Guerrero State in Mexico protest in the Zocalo to demand answers from the government of the missing students on November 5, 2014 in Mexico City, Mexico. (Brett Gundlock/Getty Images)
Family members of 43 missing students from Guerrero State in Mexico protest in the Zocalo to demand answers from the government of the missing students on November 5, 2014 in Mexico City, Mexico. (Brett Gundlock/Getty Images)

This week, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto announced a new anti-corruption initiative that will investigate allegations made against the federal government, including himself.

It’s a move, perhaps, in response to the rising public criticism of the government following the disappearance of 43 Mexican students.

Those students have been declared dead by the country’s attorney general, but the bloody and tragic events that led up to those abductions are still shrouded in mystery.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson spoke with journalist John Gibler, who has spent months uncovering sound and documenting interviews with witnesses and survivors of that night, as well as the parents of the 43, left unsatisfied by the government’s investigation.

Read John Gibler’s detailed investigation, “The Disappeared: The story of September 26, 2014, the day 43 Mexican students went missing — and how it might be a turning point for the country.”

Guest

  • John Gibler, writes from and about Mexico. He is the author of “Mexico Unconquered: Chronicles of Power and Revolt” and “To Die in Mexico: Dispatches from Inside the Drug War.”

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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