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Cancer Answers is hosted by Dr. Anees Chagpar, Associate Professor of Surgical Oncology and Director of The Breast Center at Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and Dr. Francine Foss, Professor of Medical Oncology. The show features a guest cancer specialist who will share the most recent advances in cancer therapy and respond to listeners questions. Myths, facts and advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment are discussed, with a different focus eachweek. Nationally acclaimed specialists in various types of cancer research, diagnosis, and treatment discuss common misconceptions about the disease and respond to questions from the community.Listeners can submit questions to be answered on the program at canceranswers@yale.edu or by leaving a message at (888) 234-4YCC. As a resource, archived programs from 2006 through the present are available in both audio and written versions on the Yale Cancer Center website.

Yale Students Join in "March of Resilience" Against Cultural, Racial Injustice

Hundreds of Yale University students marched through campus on Monday afternoon against what they said is a hostile climate. 

The demonstration was in response to a professor who spoke out against concern that Halloween costumes be culturally sensitive. 

Standing in front of the Afro-American Cultural Center, Yale senior Eshe Sherley said that her college community is standing together against racism.

"People are here today because they see the inhospitable climate for people of color on campus," Sherley said. "And they want to show their solidarity in building a campus that is safer for students of color to come here and do their work." 

Credit Ryan Caron King / WNPR
/
WNPR
Yale students at the March of Resilience on Monday.
Credit Ryan Caron King / WNPR
/
WNPR
Yale students at the March of Resilience on Monday.
Credit Ryan Caron King / WNPR
/
WNPR
Yale students at the March of Resilience on Monday.

Just before Halloween, a Yale email was sent reminding students to be aware of costumes that might be offensive.

A professor responded in another school-wide email suggesting that the university guidance could amount to censorship of expression.

Student Sherely said the concern about free speech distracts from the deeper problem of racism on campus. 

David finds and tells stories about education and learning for WNPR radio and its website. He also teaches journalism and media literacy to high school students, and he starts the year with the lesson: “Conflicts of interest: Real or perceived? Both matter.” He thinks he has a sense of humor, and he also finds writing in the third person awkward, but he does it anyway.

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