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Stamford Mayor is set to go on maternity leave

Stamford mayoral election debate
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public
/
Connecticut Public
Current Stamford Mayor and then-candidate Caroline Simmons, during an October debate with opponent Bobby Valentine at The Waters Edge at Giovanni’s Restaurant in Darien on Oct. 21, 2021.

Stamford Mayor Caroline Simmons is preparing to go on maternity leave later this month.

Simmons, a Democrat, said she plans to take her leave on January 26 and enjoy the newest addition to her family while staying in close contact with her staff members.

Simmons announced last September that she and her husband, former Republican state Sen. Art Linares, were expecting another son. They already have two boys — Teddy, 3, and Jack, 1.

Jeff Curtis, the Stamford Board of Representatives president, is slated to take over as acting mayor, according to the city charter. Simmons said the city’s operation and services are not expected to change.

Simmons’ time off comes a month after Connecticut began accepting applications for its new state-run paid family and medical leave program.

Eligible workers could receive up to 12 weeks of income replacement.

Copyright 2022 WSHU. To see more, visit WSHU.

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