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Rock Cats Ballpark Economics, By the Numbers

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City of Hartford
A rendering for a proposed baseball stadium in Hartford for the Rock Cats.
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Credit Jeff Cohen / WNPR
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WNPR
Mayor Pedro Segarra, left, with officials and Rock Cats players on Wednesday.

The presentation from February 2014 is short on details.

There are a lot of numbers that jump out when it comes to the proposed new minor league ballpark in Hartford – the 600 permanent, full-time jobs, the more than 9,000 seats, the 25-year deal, the $500,000 annual rent payment to the city. But there’s also the price tag itself. 

Hartford says it is willing to borrow no more than $60 million to pay for the stadium.

There’s a little more context now to that proposed price tag. While the city may borrow up to $60 million, a study performed by the company Brailsford & Dunlavey said it could cost around $50 million: $40 million in hard costs, and another $10 million in soft.

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Credit City of Hartford
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City of Hartford
A projected budget for a proposed Hartford Rock Cats stadium.
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Credit City of Hartford
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City of Hartford
Brailsford and Dunleavy gave Hartford Mayor Segarra a "ballpark planning study project update" dated February 18, 2014.

Hard costs include everything from site clearing ($360,607), to excavation ($2.7 million), to structural frame ($7.6 million), to everything else that you’d need to build a ballpark. The soft costs include things like project management, financing costs, permits, inspections, and the rest.

Otherwise, the presentation from February 2014 is short on details that back up a lot of the other economic information introduced this week. We’re working on getting more.

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