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Crisp Game Arenas

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's bring up our next two victims. They are right here. We have Blake Olmstead and Mark Kujawski. Welcome to the ASK ME ANOTHER stage.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Blake, I love that your big hobby is astronomy.

BLAKE OLMSTEAD: Yes.

EISENBERG: That is amazing to me. And it's because your grandfather built satellites.

OLMSTEAD: Yeah, he worked for TRW for a long time, and then sort of gave me the introduction into astronomy that I've carried through to, you know, the starless skies of New York.

EISENBERG: Oh, that's right. And Mark, you are from such a big trivia family that they actually banned Trivial Pursuit in your house.

MARK KUJAWSKI: That is true, yes. It's a bad incident. We can't talk about it, but...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: A trivia mishap.

KUJAWSKI: Yes.

EISENBERG: I understand.

KUJAWSKI: Yellow pie, it was bad.

EISENBERG: There was a yellow pie involved.

KUJAWSKI: Yes, yes.

EISENBERG: I understand. Well our next game is called Crisp Game Arenas. And now, I've learned something. That is when the title of the game doesn't make any sense, it's because we're talking about anagrams. That's right, in this case, crisp game arenas is what you get when you rearrange the letters to make recipe anagrams. You both are smiling, which means that you're ready.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So, contestants, in this game you have to identify the culinary dish based on its anagram. As a hint, we'll give you a list of its main ingredients. For example, if we said ski trip secretaries made of marshmallows, rice cereal and butter, you would say, oh, of course, rice krispie treats. Good luck; you're going to need it. Nasal comics, made with clams, lemon juice, breadcrumbs and bacon.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Mark?

KUJAWSKI: Clams casino.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: A conceited truffle made with flat pasta, parmesan cheese and butter. A flat pasta, parmesan cheese...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Blake?

OLMSTEAD: Fettuccini Alfredo.

EISENBERG: Yes, indeed, it is.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: It's very gratifying coming up with these answers isn't it, right?

OLMSTEAD: Oh, yeah.

EISENBERG: Yeah, it feels intense. A ham I lack a nitsack, made with chicken, tomatoes and yogurt.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Mark?

KUJAWSKI: Chicken Tikki Marsala.

JOHN CHANESKI: I say we take it, yes.

EISENBERG: I say we're going to take it.

CHANESKI: Chicken Tikka Masala.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: This is one of my favorite phrases. Senile zit wrench.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I hate it when your zit wrench gets old. Made with veal, lard and breadcrumbs.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Mark?

KUJAWSKI: Liver and onions.

(LAUGHTER)

CHANESKI: No.

EISENBERG: Yeah, it's an idea.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

OLMSTEAD: It's not bratwurst.

EISENBERG: Not bratwurst.

CHANESKI: No.

EISENBERG: But you're traveling in the right direction. It's Wienerschnitzel.

CHANESKI: Wienerschnitzel, ya.

EISENBERG: Wienerschnitzel. Doh, no neck crucible, made with chicken breast, ham and Swiss cheese.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Mark?

KUJAWSKI: Chicken cordon bleu.

EISENBERG: Chicken cordon bleu is correct.

CHANESKI: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Benign elf towel, beef tenderloin, mushrooms and puff pastry.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Mark?

KUJAWSKI: I can picture it.

OLMSTEAD: Describe it to me.

KUJAWSKI: My mother made it last Christmas. She's going to kill me.

EISENBERG: Blake wants you to give him all the details.

CHANESKI: How about if it told you that this dish defeated Napoleon?

EISENBERG: Or is a city in New Zealand.

KUJAWSKI: What, beef...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

KUJAWSKI: Beef Wellington.

EISENBERG: Beef Wellington.

CHANESKI: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Congratulations, Mark, you are going to be moving on to our Ask Me One More final round at the end of the show. Thank you, again, to Blake. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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