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Gay Marriages Cleared In Arkansas, But On Hold In Idaho

More legal wrangling over gay marriage in two states on Thursday:

In Arkansas, Pulaski County Judge Chris Piazza expanded the ruling he issued last week striking down a ban on gay marriage to also eliminate a separate law that prohibited clerks from issuing such marriage licenses.

It comes after the state's Supreme Court upheld his ruling but left the other law on the books. Piazza's expanded ruling paves the way for gay couples in Arkansas to get married.

Meanwhile, in Idaho, a federal appeals court has put gay marriages on hold while it considers the state's request for a longer stay.

On Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Candy Dale declared the state's ban on gay and lesbian couples seeking to marry as unconstitutional. But the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said Thursday that it would put the move on hold while it considers a request from the governor and attorney general to issue a stay.

Same-sex marriages are legal in 17 states and the District of Columbia.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

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