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COMIC: How living on Mars time taught me to slow down

This comic, illustrated by Anuj Shrestha, is inspired by an interview with NASA engineer Nagin Cox from TED Radio Hour's episode It Takes Time.

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/ Anuj Shrestha for NPR
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Anuj Shrestha for NPR


About Nagin Cox

Nagin Cox is a spacecraft operations engineer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. For her current mission, Cox serves as the deputy team chief of the engineering operations team for the Mars 2020 Perseverance rover. She has also held leadership and system engineering roles on robotic missions including the Galileo Mission to Jupiter, the Mars Spirit and Opportunity rovers, the Kepler Exoplanet Hunter, the InSight Mission to Mars, and the Mars Curiosity rover.

Prior to joining NASA in 1993, she served six years in the U.S. Air Force, including duty as a space operations officer at NORAD/U.S. Space Command.

Cox received her master's in space operations systems engineering from Air Force Institute of Technology and two bachelor's in engineering and psychology from Cornell University.

This segment of TED Radio Hour was produced by Matthew Cloutier and edited by Sanaz Meshkinpour. You can follow us on Twitter @TEDRadioHour and email us at TEDRadio@npr.org.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LA Johnson is an art director and illustrator at NPR. She joined in 2014 and has a BFA from The Savannah College of Art and Design.
Matthew Cloutier
Matthew Cloutier is a producer for TED Radio Hour. While at the show, he has focused on stories about science and the natural world, ranging from operating Mars rovers to exploring Antarctica's hidden life. He has also pitched these kinds of episodes, including "Through The Looking Glass" and "Migration."
Anuj Shrestha

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