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Arts & Culture

Speak For Yourself: The Power Of Trans Voices

Not everyone who is trans wants to change their voice. Some do. Either way, what do the voices - the actual voices - of trans and non-binary people tell you about who they are?

Today, you’ll meet a trans woman whose work adapting her voice led her to help others. Also, hear from a transfemme non-binary yoga teacher who uses Vedic Chanting to feel centered, and to feel closer to their voice. You’ll hear from members of a choir in the bay area that is exclusively for singers who self-identify as transgender, intersex, or gender-queer.

And you’ll get to know Lucia Lucas. She's the first female baritone to perform a principal role on an American operatic stage, and she happens to be trans.

Join the conversation onFacebook,Twitter, and email.

GUESTS:

  • Ama-Rose Wootan teaches vocal feminization and masculinization, and helps run a Discord community called Scinguistics
  • Reuben Zellman is the Founder and Director of New Voices Bay Area choir
  • Lene Kristian Bryngemark and Jasmine Gee are singers in New Voices Bay Area
  • Río Amani is a transfemme nonbinary afro latine puerto rican native living in Denver, who is has been practicing Vedic Chanting for 9 years
  • Lucia Lucas is an American opera singer living and performing in Germany. She is transgender, and the first female baritone to inhabit a principal role on an American operatic stage

Jessica Severin de Martinez and Catie Talarski contributed to this show.

Special thanks to Hilary Weissberg. She’s a Speech-Language Pathologist based in Old Saybrook CT, who suggested we explore this topic.

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Chion Wolf is the host of the radio show and podcast 'Audacious' on Connecticut Public.

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