© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY
WECS · WEDW-FM · WNPR · WPKT · WRLI-FM · WVOF
Public Files Contact · ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Amtrak service resumes from Philadelphia to New Haven after power restored to train tracks

FILE PHOTO: Amtrak has said that high temperatures across the country may require trains to operate at lower speeds, resulting in delays of up to a hour between noon and 7:30 p.m. for the remainder of the week.
Tyler Russell
/
Connecticut Public
FILE PHOTO: Amtrak has said that high temperatures across the country may require trains to operate at lower speeds, resulting in delays of up to a hour between noon and 7:30 p.m. for the remainder of the week.

Amtrak service resumed Thursday from Philadelphia to New Haven, Connecticut, in time for the evening rush hour commute after power was restored to train tracks, the national rail service said.

A circuit breaker malfunction led to a widespread loss of power on the tracks between Penn Station in New York City and Union Station in Newark, New Jersey at around 3 p.m., according to Amtrak.

As a result, trains operating between Philadelphia's 30th Street Station and New Haven's Union Station were temporarily suspended.

The agency said riders should still expect significant residual delays due to rail congestion.

Amtrack also said a brush fire east of Union Station in Newark, New Jersey, has been extinguished, and that the local fire department is clearing the scene, allowing trains to run but at restricted speeds.

Earlier Thursday, Amtrak warned on the social platform X that soaring temperatures may require trains to operate at lower speeds, resulting in delays of up to a hour between noon and 7:30 p.m. for the remainder of the week.

This story has been updated.

The Associated Press is one of the largest and most trusted sources of independent newsgathering, supplying a steady stream of news to its members, international subscribers and commercial customers. AP is neither privately owned nor government-funded; instead, it's a not-for-profit news cooperative owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.