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Hillary Clinton Rallies In Central Falls

Clinton is welcomed to the stage at Central Falls High School by Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI).
Kristin Gourlay
/
RIPR
Clinton is welcomed to the stage at Central Falls High School by Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI).
Clinton is welcomed to the stage at Central Falls High School by Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI).
Credit Kristin Gourlay / RIPR
/
RIPR
Clinton is welcomed to the stage at Central Falls High School by Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI).

Hillary Clinton was in Central Falls Saturday to campaign in advance of Tuesday’s primary election. 

Rhode Island’s Democractic leadership turned out in force to welcome Clinton, including the state’s congressional delegation and Gov. Gina Raimondo.

Then Clinton took the stage before a crowd of about a thousand supporters:“I love this little state," she said. "I have so many friends here. I know how resilient and hard working the people in this state are.”

The former secretary of state began her speech with promises for better economic times, much like the ones, she said, her husband presided over in the 1990s. She promised to bring equal pay to women and boost the minimum wage. And she said she would support the creation of more high paying union jobs, all of which were big applause lines.

Before wrapping up, Clinton made sure to ask supporters to vote in Tuesday’s primary, which could be a close contest with her democratic rival Bernie Sanders.

Copyright 2016 The Public's Radio

Kristin Espeland Gourlay joined Rhode Island Public Radio in July 2012. Before arriving in Providence, Gourlay covered the environment for WFPL Louisville, KY’s NPR station. And prior to that, she was a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio. Gourlay earned her MS from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and her BA in anthropology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, OR.

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