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Your Travel Tips For Students Headed To The Developing World

Well it's not quite the developing world, but whether you're in Stratford-upon-Avon (above) or Timbuktu, Andrea Lance's advice holds true: "Live in the moment."
Courtesy of Andrea Lance
Well it's not quite the developing world, but whether you're in Stratford-upon-Avon (above) or Timbuktu, Andrea Lance's advice holds true: "Live in the moment."

This month, we asked our audience to offer advice on how to make the best of a student program in the developing world. From dozens of tips, shared on Twitter using #NPRTravelHacks, we chose 13 of our favorites.

1. Get those Zzzs

2. Bring a Polaroid camera

"Make sure to give back. I have heard from countless people that photographers and journalists visit and never send the photographs they take to these people who offer their time and support. I brought a Polaroid camera with me, so I could give people their picture right there and then." -Molly, in a comment on NPR.org

3. Check your ego at the door

4. Haggle

5. Back up EVERYTHING

6. Do the research

7. Wash your hands!

8. Don't forget that student I.D.

9. Y.O.L.O.

10. Befriend the locals

11. Keep a journal... or blog

12. Self-reflect

13. Adapt

It's not too late to add your thoughts. Share your advice on Twitter (photos welcome!) with the hashtag #NPRTravelHacks and @NPRGlobalHealth or leave a comment below.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Malaka Gharib is the deputy editor and digital strategist on NPR's global health and development team. She covers topics such as the refugee crisis, gender equality and women's health. Her work as part of NPR's reporting teams has been recognized with two Gracie Awards: in 2019 for How To Raise A Human, a series on global parenting, and in 2015 for #15Girls, a series that profiled teen girls around the world.

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