© 2022 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Entertainment Venues Are Reopening. Have You Been To A Live Event?

The audience at the Lollapalooza Festival in Olympic Park in Berlin as seen on Sept. 8, 2019.
dpa/picture alliance via Getty

As we head into summer, 40% of adults in the U.S. have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

Many entertainment venues across the country have been shuttered for more than a year. But stages and screens are starting to bring back performances with live audiences. Meanwhile, in some places, the show went on even during the pandemic.

As the country moves more toward a full reopening, NPR is wondering what your first encounter with a live-audience event was like. Where did you go? Who did you see perform? Were there a lot of people? How did you feel? Did you wait until you were vaccinated to buy your tickets? Did the audience members wear masks and distance?

Tell us about your experience using the form below. There's a place to upload a photo, audio or video if you have it, too.

An NPR producer may reach out to you for an upcoming story.

Your submission will be governed by our general Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. As the Privacy Policy says, we want you to be aware that there may be circumstances in which the exemptions provided under law for journalistic activities or freedom of expression may override privacy rights you might otherwise have.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Meghan Collins Sullivan is a senior editor on the Arts & Culture Desk, overseeing non-fiction books coverage at NPR. She has worked at NPR over the last 13 years in various capacities, including as the supervising editor for NPR.org – managing a team of online producers and reporters and editing multi-platform news coverage. She was also lead editor for the 13.7: Cosmos and Culture blog, written by five scientists on topics related to the intersection of science and culture.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content