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Will Free Lollapalooza Tickets Inspire People To Get Vaccinated?

NOEL KING, HOST:

The pandemic just about put an end to live music last year. Tours were cancelled, venues were closed, and multiday music festivals were definitely out of the question. But things are looking up.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

LORI LIGHTFOOT: What do you think, Allison?

ALLISON ARWADY: You know, I think we can do it. We keep getting people vaccinated. We keep making good progress. I'm giving the green light.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

That's Chicago's mayor, Lori Lightfoot, and public health commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady last month announcing the go-ahead for Lollapalooza, the annual music festival held in Grant Park in Chicago. The headliners this year include Miley Cyrus...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WE CAN'T STOP")

MILEY CYRUS: (Singing) And we can't stop.

INSKEEP: ...Megan Thee Stallion...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BODY")

MEGAN THEE STALLION: (Singing) Body-ody-ody-ody-ody-ody-ody-ody-ody-ody-ody-ody-ody.

INSKEEP: ...The Foo Fighters....

(SOUNDBITE OF FOO FIGHTERS SONG, "LEARN TO FLY")

INSKEEP: ...And dozens of other acts.

KING: This coming Saturday, the city is going to give away 1,200 Lollapalooza tickets to people who get their COVID-19 vaccine. Here's how it will work. Four sites in Chicago will offer the vaccine along with one-day passes to anyone who gets a shot. Each vaccine site corresponds to one of the four festival days. So whether you want to get down....

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

KING: ...Or belt out the classics...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "DON'T STOP BELIEVIN'")

STEVE PERRY: (Singing) Strangers waiting...

KING: ...This shot could be your ticket.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "DON'T STOP BELIEVIN'")

PERRY: (Singing) ...Up and down the boulevard, their shadows searching... Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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