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The Atlanta Braves shut out the Astros 7-0 to become World Series champions

Atlanta Braves relief pitcher Will Smith and catcher Travis d'Arnaud celebrate after winning baseball's World Series in Game 6 against the Houston Astros Tuesday, in Houston. The Braves won 7-0.
Sue Ogrocki
/
AP
Atlanta Braves relief pitcher Will Smith and catcher Travis d'Arnaud celebrate after winning baseball's World Series in Game 6 against the Houston Astros Tuesday, in Houston. The Braves won 7-0.

It was pretty clear throughout Game 6 Tuesday night, that barring big mistakes or a miracle, the Atlanta Braves were going to be crowned World Series champions.

The Braves shut out the Houston Astros 7-0 — winning in Minute Maid Park in Houston to take the series, 4-2.

The Astros had gotten the hometown crowd excited days earlier because they had beaten the Braves in Game 5, 9-5. The Braves could have walked away with the title that Sunday night but the Astros rallied.

There was no rally Tuesday night for the Astros. The Braves showed no mercy as they quickly led the game 3-0 by the middle of the third inning when outfielder Jorge Soler had a three-run homer over the train tracks in left field.

It was Soler's third home run of the series, and he was named the series Most Valuable Player.

Dansby Swanson and Freddie Freeman also homered in Game 6.

In the first inning, Michael Brantley stepped on Braves pitcher Max Fried's right ankle. It didn't seem to matter, because after that Fried got 18 outs against the 19 batters he faced. He also became the first pitcher in this series to complete six innings.

The Braves were last champions in 1995 when they beat the Cleveland Indians. The Atlanta franchise now has its fourth World Series title.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Doreen McCallister

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