© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Vermont House approves legislation to prohibit race-based hair discrimination

Empty chairs sit at two rows of curved desks.
Sophie Stephens
/
Vermont Public
The Vermont House of Representatives approved legislation this week that would prohibit race-based hair discrimination. The legislation now goes to the Vermont Senate.

The Vermont House has given its strong approval to legislation that prohibits racial discrimination based on hair types, textures and styles.

Morristown Rep. Saudia LaMont says it's becoming more common for school officials to tell young female Black students that their hair styles are not appropriate and need to be changed.

And she says Black adult women also face discrimination for their hair that limits job opportunities.

"The freedom to take pride in one's appearance in ways people choose, that feels in alignment with the traits that are associated with their race, improves confidence, self esteem, dignity and respect," LaMont says.

"The freedom to take pride in one's appearance in ways people choose, that feels in alignment with the traits that are associated with their race, improves confidence, self esteem, dignity and respect."
Morristown Rep. Saudia LaMont

This legislation comes on the heels of other instances of discrimination against natural hairstyles. A Black high school student in Texas has been repeatedly suspended for a hairstyle that the school claims is against the dress code.

Texas, among other states, has legislation that prohibits race-based hair discrimination, through the CROWN Act. Similar legislation has been passed by the U.S. House.

The measure now goes to the Vermont Senate for its consideration.

Have questions, comments or tips? Send us a message.

Bob Kinzel has been covering the Vermont Statehouse since 1981 — longer than any continuously serving member of the Legislature. With his wealth of institutional knowledge, he answers your questions on our series, "Ask Bob."

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content