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North Korea Missile Launch Fails A Day After Military Parade

An unidentified missile is displayed during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang, the nation's capital, on Saturday.
Ed Jones
/
AFP/Getty Images
An unidentified missile is displayed during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang, the nation's capital, on Saturday.

North Korea launched an unidentified missile, unsuccessfully, on Sunday morning from its east coast, near Sinpo, say U.S. military officials.

"The missile blew up almost immediately. The type of missile is still being assessed," the U.S. Pacific Command says in an emailed statement.

The failed missile launch comes just a day after North Korea brandished what appeared to be long-range and submarine-based missiles as part of a military parade, celebrating the 105th birthday of its late founder, Kim Il Sung.

Vice President Mike Pence arrived in Seoul, South Korea shortly after the failed missile launch. He's scheduled to be in Asia for a 10-day trip. Pence was briefed on the situation while flying to South Korea, reporter Jihye Lee tells our newscast.

South Korea said the missile launch "threatened the whole world," Reuters reported.

"This is the same location as Pyongyang's latest missile launch 11 days ago, when another missile was said to have failed after flying some 60 km into the waters between Korea and Japan," Lee reports.

"The president and his military team are aware of North Korea's most recent unsuccessful missile launch. The president has no further comment," Secretary of Defense James Mattis said in a statement.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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