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Analyst Sidney Jones: Crisis in South East Asia

Sidney Jones is the director of the International Crisis Group's South East Asia Project. She has examined separatist conflicts, ethnic conflict, and terrorism in the region, with much of her attention focused on work in Indonesia.

Jones was deported from Indonesia when one of her reports about terrorism there was published in June of 2004. We discuss how the Indian Ocean tsunami has affected the already politically unstable Indonesia, and what the disaster has done to the efforts of rebel and militant Islamic groups there.

Sidney Jones was Asia Director at the Human Rights Watch from 1989 to 2002. She has also worked for Amnesty International and the Ford Foundation.

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