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What Amazing Thing Did Toronto's Mayor Say Today?

Mayor Rob Ford was wearing a Toronto Argonauts football jersey when at City Hall on Thursday. He was also making some rather crude comments in response to some of the latest allegations about his behavior.
Mark Blinch
/
Reuters /Landov
Mayor Rob Ford was wearing a Toronto Argonauts football jersey when at City Hall on Thursday. He was also making some rather crude comments in response to some of the latest allegations about his behavior.

After admitting to smoking crack, to buying illegal drugs and to more than once being in a drunken stupor, it would seem like Toronto Mayor Rob Ford couldn't say anything else that would really shock anyone.

Well ...

Responding to a new Toronto Globe And Mail report about lewd comments he allegedly made to a woman and other alleged misdeeds of his, Ford denied he'd said those things. Then he went on — using a crude 5-letter word for a woman's genitalia — to say he can get "more than enough ... at home."

Now, we know that some commenters will take us to task for not reprinting the mayor's exact words. If you wish to read them and watch him say them, click this link to the Toronto Star.

And yes, we realize it's somewhat odd to write about such comments without repeating them. Given that Ford is the mayor of Canada's largest city, they're newsworthy. So we wanted to note what happened. But we also wanted to do so while giving everyone a choice about whether they really want to read them or not.

Click here if you want to see NPR's position on "offensive language."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Mark Memmott is NPR's supervising senior editor for Standards & Practices. In that role, he's a resource for NPR's journalists – helping them raise the right questions as they do their work and uphold the organization's standards.

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