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South Carolina beats UConn to win 2022 NCAA women's championship

South Carolina players celebrate after winning the championship on Sunday night.
Eric Gay
/
AP
South Carolina players celebrate after winning the championship on Sunday night.

Updated April 3, 2022 at 11:13 PM ET

The University of South Carolina triumphed over the University of Connecticut with a score of 64-49, crowning the Gamecocks as 2022 NCAA March Madness champions in the women's bracket.

After securing a lead at halftime, the Gamecocks continued plowing forward until the end of the game. Guard Destanni Henderson delivered on the scoreboard, earning 26 points — a career-high — for the Gamecocks.

Aliyah Boston, who is the national player of the year, dominated with 11 points and 16 rebounds. It was Boston's 29th double-double of the season, The Athletic reported.

Throughout the tourney, the Gamecocks trampled Howard, Miami, North Carolina, Creighton and Louisville before the final match-up against UConn.

Sunday's victory marked the program's second national title, elevating coach Dawn Staley to become the first Black men's or women's coach with two Division I titles. The team won their last title in 2017 when it defeated Mississippi State.

"We weren't going to be denied," Staley said.

With two championship wins under their belt, the Gamecocks are now the eighth program to win multiple women's NCAA titles. UConn leads with 11 national titles.

For Connecticut, Sunday's game was the first loss in 12 NCAA title games. The Huskies gave up 22 second-chance points and lost the rebounding battle, 49-24.

"I thought they (South Carolina) were way more physical, more aggressive," said Huskies head coach Geno Auriemma. "And I thought that was the game"

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Rina Torchinsky

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