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LISTEN: What The Coronavirus Pandemic And The George Floyd Protests Tell Us About Racism And Health

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Joe Amon
/
Connecticut Public/NENC
The Self-Defense Brigade Anti-Oppression Rally for George Floyd, at the Keney Park Woodland entrance in Hartford on June 1, 2020.

There’s long been good evidence for the premise that racism is bad for your health. And that truth stands whether you’re the victim or the perpetrator. In light of both the racial disparities of the coronavirus pandemic and the momentous events in the wake of George Floyd’s death, Connecticut Public Radio’s All Things Considered host, John Henry Smith, spoke with Dr. Cato T. Laurencin, a professor of orthopedic surgery at UConn. 

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Laurencin recently conducted a study that concluded that black people statewide had a higher per capita rate of infection and death from COVID-19 than the state’s white population.

Hear the interview below:

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