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CT Budget Being Released; Trump Being Re-impeached

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MATT DWYER / CONNECTICUT PUBLIC RADIO
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File image of a state budget document.

In the first half of the show, Connecticut Mirror budget reporter (and budget guru) Keith Phaneuf previews Governor Ned Lamont's 2-year state taxing and spending plan. The proposal is being released later today. In the short term, things are better than they appeared back in the spring. But the state still faces a fiscal slog in the long term.

In the second half of the show, UConn Professor Christopher Vials considers lessons learned from four years with Donald Trump in the oval office. American democracy survived, but is it in worse shape than it was four years ago? Is a second impeachment the right path for the country?

Guests:

Keith Phaneuf -- State budget reporter at the Connecticut Mirror (@CTMirrorKeith)

Christopher Vials -- Professor of English and Director of American Studies at UConn.  He is the co-editor of The US Antifascism Reader, released last year.

Lucy leads Connecticut Public's strategies to deeply connect and build collaborations with community-focused organizations across the state.
Matt Dwyer is a producer for Where We Live and a reporter and midday host for Connecticut Public's news department.

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