© 2022 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Hurricane's Effects Linger for Some Florida Nurseries

Rosemary Warner of Native Southeastern Trees stands by trees that were stripped nearly bare by the hurricanes. 
Ari Shapiro, NPR
/
Rosemary Warner of Native Southeastern Trees stands by trees that were stripped nearly bare by the hurricanes. 

Florida's biggest agricultural crop is nursery plants, which suffered losses when four major hurricanes swept through the state this year.

Many nursery owners are single entrepreneurs or families who can't bounce back from a natural disaster as easily as big businesses. Rosemary Warner and her husband own a 50-acre farm, Native Southeastern Trees, in Osteen, Fla. The storms destroyed more than half of their company's stock. 

The fate of nurseries varied widely across the state, from nearly unscathed to totally destroyed. NPR's Ari Shapiro continues his series of reports on the storms' long-term impact.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Ari Shapiro has been one of the hosts of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine, since 2015. During his first two years on the program, listenership to All Things Considered grew at an unprecedented rate, with more people tuning in during a typical quarter-hour than any other program on the radio.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.