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Ida Drops 7 Inches Of Rain On Fairfield County Shoreline

This photo provided by the New York City Police Department shows flooding on New York York's Upper East Side, Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2021.
New York City Police Department
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This photo provided by the New York City Police Department shows flooding on New York York's Upper East Side, Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2021.

Parts of Connecticut saw near-record rainfall from the remnants of Hurricane Ida. The storm also caused widespread outages.

Norwalk reported more than 7 inches of rain — and nearly as much fell in Stamford, Greenwich and other towns along the Fairfield County shoreline. Parts of Interstate 95 flooded overnight near Bridgeport and White Plains, according to the Connecticut Department of Transportation.

A state trooper in Woodbury was died after he reported his cruiser was swept away in overnight floods. Sergeant Brian Mohl was found as flooding receded on the Pomperaug River.

Eversource reports about 20,000 people lost power during and after the storm, into Thursday morning.
Copyright 2021 WSHU. To see more, visit WSHU.

Davis Dunavin loves telling stories, whether on the radio or around the campfire. He fell in love with sound-rich radio storytelling while working as an assistant reporter at KBIA public radio in Columbia, Missouri. Before coming back to radio, he worked in digital journalism as the editor of Newtown Patch. As a freelance reporter, his work for WSHU aired nationally on NPR. Davis is a proud graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism; he started in Missouri and ended up in Connecticut, which, he'd like to point out, is the same geographic trajectory taken by Mark Twain.

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