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Vaccination Plans Develop, Pressure To Increase Restrictions: Latest Updates On The Coronavirus

COVID collection specialist Michelle Perez swabs a visitor while being administering a test during Griffin Health's COVID-19 drive-thru testing site at Tunxis community college on November 12, 2020 in Farmington, Connecticut.
Joe Amon
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Connecticut Public/NENC
COVID collection specialist Michelle Perez swabs a visitor while being administering a test during Griffin Health's COVID-19 drive-thru testing site at Tunxis community college on November 12, 2020 in Farmington, Connecticut.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont has been coordinating closely with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo. So far, Lamont has resisted imposing the types of lockdowns instituted early in the pandemic like banning indoor dining, but Cuomo is threatening to do that in his state.

On Monday, Lamont did invite a Yale medical researcher to join him at a press conference. Unlike the governor, Dr. Manisha Juthani does want Connecticut to close restaurants and gyms.

Here are the latest updates on the coronavirus in Connecticut.

The Numbers (as of Monday)

  • Cases: 135,844 (+8,129 from Friday)
  • Tests reported: 3,536,988 (+123,021)
  • Positivity rate: 6.61%
  • Current hospitalizations: 1,183 (+33)
  • Deaths: 5,224 (+78)

10th Person In Prison Dies From Coronavirus

The Department of Correction announced that the 10th incarcerated person has died from complications related to COVID-19. The 67-year-old died on Sunday and had been treated at a hospital since late November. The ninth death was reported just two days earlier.

The DOC says it will increase the frequency of testing. Staff will be tested weekly and the inmate population will be tested biweekly.

- Tucker Ives

New Executive Orders On Vaccinations

Gov. Ned Lamont on Monday signed an executive order authorizing pharmacists to administer any coronavirus vaccine authorized by the federal Food and Drug Administration. The move expands the number of providers allowed to dispense the doses as Connecticut prepares for its first batch of deliveries later this month.

Also Monday, a group of Connecticut lawmakers plan to introduce legislation that would create a state Office of Pandemic Preparedness to focus on testing, emergency stockpiles and social services.

- Associated Press

Yale New Haven Health Staff To Start Getting Vaccinated Next Week

Officials at Yale New Haven Health are expecting to begin vaccinating staff members next week. The health system has about 29,000 employees that come into contact with patients and will be prioritized. The New Haven Register reports it will take about four to five weeks for those employees to receive the first dosage.

The vaccine will not be mandatory.

- Tucker Ives

Thanksgiving Party Leads To Avon Schools Closure

Avon schools will remain closed until Dec. 14 after a Thanksgiving party resulted in at least 10 positive COVID cases. Hearst Connecticut reports cases were found among four schools in the district so far and were linked to the outside social gathering through contact tracing.

Avon's superintendent says the district shared the information in hopes of informing, not to shame others.

- Lori Mack

Tucker Ives is WNPR's morning news producer.

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