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The week in CT news: Election '22 wrap, early voting, Alex Jones owes $1.4 billion

On election night, Jahana Hayes shares a laugh with Veronica DeLandro, a New Britain resident and former Congressional staffer.
Tyler Russell
/
Connecticut Public
On election night, Jahana Hayes shares a laugh with Veronica DeLandro, a New Britain resident and former Congressional staffer.

Frankie & Johnny is a weekly recap of news you need to know from around Connecticut. Each Friday, Connecticut Public's Frankie Graziano and John Henry Smith take you through the headlines and get you up-to-date on the stories you may have missed — in less than five minutes. This week Frankie & Johnny explain:

  • Midterm election results including a tight win for Jahana Hayes in the 5th Congressional District. Hayes defeated GOP challenger George Logan in a tight race that brought in millions of dollars in outside spending by groups aligned with both Democrats and Republicans.
  • Connecticut voters approved a ballot question on early voting. With the measure approved, the state legislature will be authorized to draft legislation that would implement an early voting system. It could be in place as early as 2024.
  • Infowars host Alex Jones was ordered this week to pay $473 million in punitive damages to families of Sandy Hook School shooting victims for lies he tells about the tragedy.

Frankie & Johnny premieres Fridays at 4:44 p.m. during All Things Considered on Connecticut Public Radio.

If you read any of Frankie Graziano’s previous biographies, they’d be all about his passion for sports. But times change – and he’s a family man now.
John Henry Smith is Connecticut Public’s host of All Things Considered, its flagship afternoon news program. In his 20th year as a professional broadcaster, he’s covered both news and sports.

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