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Juveniles, Joyrides, and Justice: Radio Special

Signs outside of the South Windsor Police Department encourage residents to lock their cars at night.
Ryan Caron King
/
Connecticut Public
Signs outside of the South Windsor Police Department encourage residents to lock their cars at night.

All summer long, we heard about spiking crime rates, stolen cars and a failed juvenile justice system, but what do the numbers show? And what do those who actually work with juvenile offenders think is happening? Has the pandemic had any affect on the juvenile justice system?

This half hour radio special explores these issues through reporting from Connecticut Public's Accountability Project.

Walter Smith Randolph is Connecticut Public’s Investigative Editor. In 2021, Walter launched The Accountability Project, CT Public’s investigative reporting initiative. Since then, the team’s reporting has led to policy changes across the state. Additionally, The Accountability Project’s work has been honored with a National Edward R. Murrow award from RTDNA, two regional Murrow awards, a national Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists, three regional EMMY nominations and a dozen CT SPJ awards.
Jacqueline Rabe Thomas was an investigative reporter with Connecticut Public’s Accountability Project from July 2021 until August 2022.
Jim Haddadin is deputy editor for The Accountability Project, Connecticut Public's investigative reporting team. He was previously an investigative producer at NBC Boston, and wrote for newspapers in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. His work at NBC received a regional Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio Television Digital News Association, and a pair of Emmy awards from the New England chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. He was also recognized by the Public Media Journalists Association, Society of Professional Journalists, New England Newspaper & Press Association, New Hampshire Press Association and Connecticut Society of Professional Journalists for political coverage, investigative reporting and stories about government transparency. When he's not working, Jim is doing whatever his dog wants.

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