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Arts & Culture

The Nose: "Protected" Tweets, Monopoly's Cat, The USPS, & Bombogenesis

http://cptv.vo.llnwd.net/o2/ypmwebcontent/Chion/Colin%20McEnroe%20Show%2002-08-2013.mp3

It feels good to do radio in a big snow storm. Can I read some cancellations? Episcopalian Primal Scream of Newington, the Little Bitty Bitty Ducky Dirty Diaper Day Car, Etruscan Goat Dancing, are all canceled.

The poet Bill Collins writes of:

"The government buildings smothered,
schools and libraries buried, the post office lost
under the noiseless drift,
the paths of trains softly blocked,
the world fallen under this falling."

And James Joyce's snow "lay thickly drifted on the crooked crosses and headstones, on the spears of the little gate, on the barren thorns. His soul swooned slowly as he heard the snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead."

You can join the conversation, e-mail colin@wnpr.org or Tweet us @wnprcolin.

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Arts & Culture The Nose
Colin McEnroe is a radio host, newspaper columnist, magazine writer, author, playwright, lecturer, moderator, college instructor and occasional singer. Colin can be reached at colin@ctpublic.org.

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